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Arginine - Uses, Benefits, Sources

Arginine also refer as L- arginine, is one of many amino acids that helps make proteins. It also becomes the gas nitric oxide (NO) in the body. It is obtained from many diet such as eggs, red meats, milk, soy proteins, peanuts, and walnuts. It can also be made in a laboratory and used as medicine.

L-arginine is most commonly used for recovery after surgery, a pregnancy complication marked by high blood pressure and protein in the urine (pre-eclampsia), and heart and blood vessel conditions, such as chest pain (angina) and high blood pressure. It is also used for many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support many of these uses.

Health Benefits Of Arginine

L-arginine has two effects: it turns into nitric oxide and helps the body build protein.

The following are some examples of researched benefits and uses of L-arginine:

L-arginine has two effects: it turns into nitric oxide and helps the body build protein.

The following are some examples of researched benefits and uses of L-arginine:

  •  Growth hormone reserve test
  •  Improve blood flow
  •  Reducing high blood pressure
  •  Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  •  Correcting inborn errors of urea synthesis
  •  Treating heart disease
  •  Improve flexibility/strength
  •  Treating erectile dysfunction (ED)
  •  Controlling blood sugar in people with diabetes
  •  Easing inflammation of the digestive tract in premature infants
  •  Alleviate anxiety
  •  Treat burns
  •  Enhance exercise performance

Sources Of Arginine

Various meats, dairy products, seeds, and nuts contain arginine. Adding some or all of these foods to the diet can help a person increase their arginine intake.

Foods rich in arginine include:

  •  Turkey
  •  Pork loin
  •  Chicken
  •  Pumpkin seeds
  •  Seaweed
  •  Soybeans
  •  Nuts and seeds
  •  Peanuts
  •  Chickpeas
  •  Lentils

Side Effects Of Arginine

L-arginine has some potential side effects to be aware of when taking it as a supplement. Some of the more common and benign side effects include:

  •  Bloating
  •  Gout
  •  Abdominal pain
  •  Diarrhea
  •  Airway inflammation
  •  Worsening of asthma
  •  Low blood pressure
  •  Blood abnormalities
  •  Allergies

Important Note

Most adults produce enough arginine, but children need to absorb extra amounts from the diet to support their growth and development.

Some disorders can lead to arginine deficiency. In this case, a person may need to incorporate arginine-rich foods into the diet.

A variety of foods are rich in arginine, including legumes, nuts, and meats. There are risks to taking in too much arginine, a person should speak to their doctor before using arginine supplements.